How to Get a Great Internship

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Break out your suits and resume folders because it’s time to find an internship. Perhaps you don’t know how to format your resume or even where to begin? If you want to get offers from your favorite employers, you must set yourself apart from the rest.

So what if Susie has a 4.0? You have personality, and that’s what big companies are looking for. Here’s an example of the ideal resume below:

THIS IS MY RESUME       
173 Harbin Hall, Washington, DC 20057; 555-555-5555
(I’m not the best at picking up calls so shoot me a text)

EDUCATION

Georgetown University, Washington, DC
Cumulative GPA: Cura Personalis, right?
Major: Computer Science (I haven’t taken a class but I think I like technology and all that so it should be easy)
High School Cumulative GPA: 4.00 (Yup, high school was pretty much my academic peak. I still keep this on my resume to prove that I am smart.)

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Successfully skipped my 8:00 am Problem of God class 4 Fridays in a row and still got an A. (I can’t let class disrupt my thirsty Thursday festivities)
  • Cumulatively stole 43 chocolate chip cookies, 30 apples and 5 pounds of Special K cereal from Leo’s in one year.
  • Once fit 178 practice problems on a half-page formula sheet for my finance midterm. (#Aced it)

SKILLS

  • Franzia connoisseur. (I can smell the difference between Sunset Blush and White Zinfandel from a mile away. They have quite distinct aromas. If you swish the Sunset Blush around in your red solo cup you can almost smell the oak.)
  • Ask me to sing any Taylor Swift song and I’ll know the lyrics.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

  • Photographer (My Instagram has 100 followers)
  • Model (My aforementioned Instagram account only consists of selfies)

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

  • GU(random letter I forget)A, Social Chair
    • I threw really great parties. (I’m not really sure what the organization actually does though. I haven’t been to many of the meetings.)
  • Freshman Class Committee, Chair                                                                                    
    • Yeah we didn’t really do anything.
    • Planed social and philanthropic events to unite 7,636 undergraduate students and better the Georgetown community.
    • Managed and allocated $2,000 of funding during the 2013- 2014 academic year.

TECHNICAL & LANGUAGE SKILLS

  • Excel, PowerPoint, Microsoft Word (I’m really technologically advanced, hence the Computer Science Major)
  • Spanish (I took it in high school and remember how to say the important things, like enchilada)

So there you have it, Hoyas. Just follow our ready-to-go resume example above, and you’ll never need to visit the Career Center ever again!

Photo: sudikeff.ucla.edu

The Five Times When You Know You Are A Senior

SENIORS

I am officially old. And, by old, I mean 20. But, I am a senior, which means I have three years of classes, parties and Wisey’s cookies to look back on.

Everyone always talks about how senior year is the best and so fun, but I think that someone has been lying to me. Don’t get me wrong, I always have a good time at Georgetown. But senior year, at least the fall, is beyond stressful. You’ve got classes, clubs, relationships (LOL or lack there of), internships, job recruitment and bills. Honestly, the list could go on and on.

So, in light of what I have experienced the last few weeks, here are the five times when you now you are a senior at Georgetown: 

1. You have explained Tuscany’s so many times that you are depressed. The youth has been deprived. I explained the saga of going to Tuscany’s yesterday and actually got emotional. Who doesn’t miss the curb sing-a-longs? Or, wait, was that just me?

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2. People expect you to know things. While I love all my new bloggers, who you will meet soon, they are definitely giving me too much credit. I say such nonsense. Words. Am I making up things? Most likely.

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I know less than Michael Scott.

3. You don’t know what Leo’s serves anymore. Literally I am looking for someone with a meal plan to take me to Leo’s for a #TBT. I miss it. I never thought I would say that. The kids these days keep mentioning these new stations and options, and I just shrug and disappear into the corner.

4. You would rather have a party with only your friends than spend the night at Rugby. Or Chimes. Or Brown House. Or SigEp (RIP Pink House). Why isn’t it socially acceptable to just sit around with my, like, 15 friends and gossip about people? I’ve met everyone at this school anyway!

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5. You cringe whenever you heard the G-word. And by that I mean graduation. Cringe. You can’t conceptualize how scary the real world is until you are sitting at your billionth information session at the career center thinking, “How the f*** did I get here?”

Thank god graduation isn’t for a few more months. I am not ready to be kicked out yet.

Photos/Gifs: gifsec.com; tumblr.com

Summertime and Everything is Free

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Thank John Carroll that it is finally summer. It is time to relax and say helloooo to summer.

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While this relaxation is perfect right now, we will soon have to face the revelation that summer means jobs. We all might wanna spend our time exploring and living easy, but exploring costs money that we just don’t have. Why do all fun things need to cost money?!

Well, thankfully this summer, they do not have to. Recently, there has been an explosion of Facebook events advertising free events in major U.S. cities! Supposedly these events will contain updated lists of activities that you can participate in, free of charge.

As of now these events exist for cities like: 

D.C.

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NYC

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Austin

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Chicago

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and a bunch of international cities as well!

 Bring on the adventures and the #free things. And remember, the silent disco in Dupont is only a few weeks away!

Photos/Gifs: Tumblr.com, giphy.com, 

How to Talk to a Second Semester Senior

Second Semester SeniorsAs they begin their last semester of college, the members of the Class of 2014 are in a strange place. Some of them have job offers and graduate school acceptances, but many of them do not. Whether they’re happy to graduate or wishing they had four more years, they should be handled delicately. Here are some tips from an expert (i.e., one of those stressed seniors) about what to say to these tender children.

Do not ask what they’re doing next year.

Most seniors do not have concrete plans yet. Even the few who do have law school acceptances, offers from consulting firms or Teach for America acceptances aren’t exempt from the self-doubt and anxiety that can come from contemplating the post-grad life. If you’ve somehow found a senior who doesn’t freak out when considering what lies beyond May 2014, at the very least they’re tired of talking about it.

Do not ask what it feels like to be a second semester senior.

It feels scary and exciting and weird and wonderful. Often at the same time. Do not use this as small talk unless you really want to know those things.

Do ask for advice.

Seniors are full of advice, and they’re also really self-absorbed, so they love giving it. They have wisdom about basically everything: classes, internships, relationships, extracurriculars and friendships.

But do not ask about the future of their relationships and friendships.

Your single friends have never felt more hopelessly single than they do right now, after winter break and a litany of aunts and uncles asking if they have a “special someone.” Those in relationships are all worried about whether they’ll last post-May 17. This also applies to all of their friendships, so don’t ask how much they’re going to miss their best friends. The answer? A lot.

Do accompany them to the Tombs.

Seniors love Tombs and as many of them begin 99 Days next month, they’re going to need some company. If you’re not 21, there’s always weekend brunch, lunch and dinner.

Do not judge them for the #SWUG life.

A SWUG is a senior wash-up girl. The SWUG life means going out without getting dressed up, staying in to drink wine and watch movies and napping at inappropriate times. We know your judgement is just envy.

Do be their cheerleader.

Whether they’re applying to grad programs, going to a job interview, starting a blog or finally showering, support them in their endeavors! A cheerful text or a hug might just make their day. For my fellow seniors, here’s a piece of advice from the latest episode of “Parks and Recreation” and my personal hero, Leslie Knope:

In times of stress or moments of transition, sometimes it can feel the whole world is closing in on you. When that happens you should close your eyes, take a deep breath, listen to the people who love you when they give you advice and remember what really matters.

Photo: Wikipedia

The Five People You’ll Meet on the DC Metro this Summer

DC MetroAs Hoyas, we try to break the bubble as much possible, which means that we’ll likely take a trip on the metro at some point. You’ll probably meet an interesting array of people so here’s a catalog of these people to help you out.

1. The Business Professional

These “yopros” may be annoying, but for many Georgetown students this may be your future. They’re always impeccably dressed with their suits and briefcases and as you travel further into the political heart of DC, you’ll notice that they all have a government-issued security badge. The fresher the hire, the more prominently displayed the badge. They’ll spend most of the ride glued to their smartphone in an attempt to appear productive and important. They’re mostly rush-hour Metro patrons and carry that no-nonsense attitude with them all the time. If you block them on the escalator prepare to be body-slammed.

2. The Tourist

While this breed of Metro-rider is only seen at certain times of the day, the mighty Tourist is a constant presence. Their guide books will tell them to stay away from the Green & Yellow lines (which is stupid) and they will most likely be found on the Blue & Orange lines loudly counting down the stops until the Smithsonian station where they will all depart. Chances are that they will be wearing matching running shoes, fanny packs and tacky Washington D.C. t-shirts and will have a particularly noticeable regional accent. These are the people who stand on the left side of the escalator and take up two seats for one person during rush hour. They just don’t get it.

3. The Family

This type is similar to the Tourist, but the Family unit is ten times worse because they come with loud unruly children. Even if they aren’t tourists, kids have a way of almost getting shut in doors and causing general mayhem. The worst is when parents try to bring strollers into the crowded car and are surprised – mad even – when it doesn’t really fit. They shout, they move around a lot, they miss their stops a lot – they are the embodiment of a Metro nightmare.

4. The Probably Homeless Person

This guy may be homeless, or he may just be making a unique personal lifestyle choice, but he certainly does smells very strange. This person probably has a fairly large collection of empty seats around them – this is partly due to the smell, and partly due to the fact that he may be talking to himself. Even though he may be a perfectly nice person, it’s probably best to give him some space.

5. You

You’re either commuting to your internship or exploring more of the city, but you know enough of the unspoken Metro rules to get by. You have learned to not stand on the left side of the escalators, to not sit in the handicapped seats and, even though you probably don’t know exactly where you’re going, you definitely learned not to discuss that fact too loudly. You’re really just trying to take advantage of everything DC has to offer, and the Metro is the easiest way to do that.

Photo: Anamsong

InternTips: A Balancing Act

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Some of you luckier ones out there might still be in that “cool summer job” phase this time around. You know what I mean: lifeguarding, babysitting, camp counseling, etc. — basically anything that’s not supposed to be preparing you for your future career path.

Up until last summer, I was in that boat myself with a cushy job at the local recreation department on the Jersey Shore (no, not that one) that involved a lot of playing sports with little kids and otherwise getting paid to sit around and do nothing. Now I’m taking a class while working a full-time unpaid internship. Go figure.

But that’s not at all to say that I’m looking at Summer 2013 as a wash. If you’re looking to sort out how to handle your commitments this summer while still having a good time, you’ve come to the right place. 4E is here with InternTips. A handy reoccurring post that will help you out with intern life.

Yes, you may no longer have the luxury of that beautifully cushy job where you got paid to tan or watch TV, but that doesn’t mean that it’s time to flip the switch and start working yourself to death. Even legitimate professionals take the summer easier than the rest of the year — people are noticeably less motivated to get work done in their depressing cubicle when it’s hot and sunny outside.

And newsflash: If you are going to be in D.C., it’s going to be extra hot and sunny for you. No one wants you to flood your internship office with your sweat, especially considering the fact that, in all likelihood, YOU’RE NOT EVEN GETTING PAID. So chill out.

That said, let’s not go crazy with the lazy. There’s certainly something to be said for getting a leg up, so constant slacking off just isn’t going to cut it once you’ve gotten to my unfortunate rising junior phase.

Internships are annoying and borderline enslavement, yes, but they also represent your only real chance to secure recommendations to show to future employers. It’s easy from a shortsighted perspective to see why the thought of getting fired from an unpaid internship might actually be kind of nice — you’d make the same amount partying or sitting playing Xbox as you would at that office at McPherson Square, after all.

You’re going to be asked what you did each summer, and you’ll be expected to provide concrete details. Make sure you’ve earned something tangible to say.

Perhaps you’re able to get by at your job by working only when the higher-ups are around, and you trick them into thinking you’re doing stuff. If so, then honestly, congrats, because you’ve managed to beat the system. But for the rest of us, presumably working with/for moderately intelligent people, then you’re going to have to put in the time and put in the effort. It might only be photocopying — which seems to be a great deal of what interns and even lower-level employees are doing nowadays — but it still counts. And it’s really not that difficult. Buck up, and do some work!

Okay, so at this point I’m not sure I can make my ultimate message here any more obvious. Summers can be big in terms of showcasing your legitimate, employable talents: “All right, you’re an A/B/C student. Now let’s see what you can actually do.

No one in our society anymore seems to be allowed to graduate without at least one internship, which means that those without them aren’t nearly as competitive. Taking classes to boost school-year grades or open up more time during the year (maybe for another internship) can make sense for some people too.

But don’t kill yourself over all of it.

In fact, if you’re the type of kid who feels the need to sacrifice all fun things just to work, then you’re likely also the type of kid who badly needs time off to relax and recharge.

When you get home from your internship or you finish up the day’s classes, allot some “me time” for yourself. Maybe that means throwing your work clothes on the floor, kicking your feet up to watch some TV or just getting away completely and enjoying the weather outside.

At the same time, don’t let yourself do nothing, either. You know the old adage: “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” And it will also make you jobless, unmarketable and lazy.

Could a summer of 24/7 work help you toward your goal of running the world one day? Sure. But you can’t sacrifice on treatin’ yourself at least every once in a while. You go to Georgetown; you’ve earned it.

Stay strong out there, Hoyas. And remember: balance.

Summer InternTips: Gaining Respect

You’ve spent a couple of weeks at your internship now, and now that you’ve avoided most of the first week pitfalls, you’re ready to get more exciting assignments and take full advantage of your internship experience. Last week, we here at 4E gave you some tips to make your first week awesome. Now, we’ll give you the tips you need to gain respect at the workplace.

1. Volunteer for things. Most internships are composed of primarily tasks fulltime staff members don’t want to or don’t have time ro perform themselves. So, they’ll often ask for assistance on less exciting or less important projects that still need to be done. Especially if you’re in an office with other interns or if you have extra time on your hands, volunteering for extra projects is the best way to get noticed.

2. Don’t be shy. One of the best ways to get to know your coworkers is by meeting them in the hallways, in the break room, at lunch or when you walk by their office. Instead of customarily nodding or waving at them, introduce yourself politely. A lot of interns fall into the pitfall of being “the intern” that no one knows, so get people to know your name as opposed to your title.

3. Don’t slack off. If you have a project, get straight to work. If you don’t have a project, ask for one quickly. Most interns aren’t well known in their offices because they don’t do a lot of work. They sit around dillydallying on Facebook, ESPN, Twitter or Pinterest as opposed to asking for other work. If you really don’t have anything to do, read the news or other relevant materials to your internship (like company reports, etc.).

4. Know your work as well as everyone else does. The hardest part about interning somewhere for one summer is familiarizing yourself with your employer and your employer’s work. Still, you work there, and you should try to get to know the issues as well as everyone else in your office. This means reading industry news websites, following similar organizations’ work and asking around the office to figure out what specific people are working on.

5. Show off (but not too much). Don’t be afraid to showcase you knowledge, your skill set and your Georgetown education. Just don’t make a big deal of it. Everyone else at the office will start to hate you if you do. But, if you can show your skills in a humble way, you’ll score major points with the office.

6. Learn names. Try to learn you coworkers’ names, and address them by name. It gives them an incentive to address you by name, as well.

7. Take notes and ask questions so that your work will be the best it can be. When you get an assignment, make sure that you know how to do it before you start. That way, you’ll turn out better work and you’ll start to earn respect in the workplace. The best way to earn respect at work is by doing something that deserves respect.

Photo credit: cybermonsters.blogspot.com

7 Questions with Capitol Hill Style

The internet is full of fashion blogs – from daily outfit posts to brand marketing to couture appreciation – but amid the bevy of style-based blogs, Capitol Hill Style stands out. The blog’s author, Belle (she keeps her real identity a secret), offers style and beauty tips tailored to the D.C. working woman’s needs. She posts daily, with regular features like Splurge vs. Save, Two Ways , and the 10th Commandment, with covetable items at different price points (don’t worry, Belle looks out for the unpaid interns among her readers).
We got a chance to ask Belle some questions about her inspiration, her own style and what to do when you’re just starting out.

When did you start blogging, and what inspired Capitol Hill Style?
I started blogging in 2008 during the August recess.  I was inspired to start the blog after seeing how the summer interns on the Hill dressed for work.  Half of them were dressed for the club, and the other half looked like they were wearing clothes stolen from Mommy’s closet.  At the time, there were no professional style blogs geared toward women under age 40, and I thought it was about time Capitol Hill had a resource for young women who want to dress appropriately but be stylish as well.

 

How would you describe your style?
Sophisticated and feminine, I like a good mix of pretty and sleek.  I prefer dresses and skirts to pants.  I also like to wear feminine fabrics like silk and chiffon with ladylike accents. I try to keep up with current trends, but when I’m unsure, I stick with the classics.

 

D.C. style gets a pretty bad rap – where do you think this comes from? Is it legitimate?
D.C. style has changed a lot in the past few years. When I moved to the District in 2005, women still wore white sneakers with suits and nude hose.  Almost no one wore dresses to work, it was all pants.  And women seemed content to downplay their femininity rather than embrace it.  So in the past, the criticisms were certainly valid.

Now, I see more women who recognize that you can be a professional who is taken seriously without having to dress in shapeless, masculine attire and bad shoes.  What’s the point of having a successful, well-paying job if you have to wear clogs and tapered trousers? Ick.

 

Do you have a D.C. fashion role model?
Former Congresswoman Jane Harman was probably as close as I came to having a real fashion role model in D.C.  She had the most amazing wardrobe and the attitude to match.  No one else could have pulled off a chartreuse silk pleated skirt on the floor of the House. She made me realize that it’s not just about the clothes, it’s about how you carry yourself.