Finding Culture in the Kitchen

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When I first talked to my mom about moving into an off-campus apartment as a first-year in college, she laughed at me. “What are you going to eat?” followed the 30 seconds of laughter. Eventually, after having a serious conversation about moving to the DMV, we made it happen. This past January, my parents and I packed up all of the suitcases in the house and flew into Virginia, ready to start this new chapter in my life.

After landing and checking out the apartment, one of the first things we did was hit up the local Asian grocers. My mom kept adding items to the cart, saying, “You’ll need this,” and, “This is easy to use.” In reality, I had no idea what I was going to do with any of the items — unless it was a snack I added myself. After checkout, I ended up with the most intimidating ingredients on the planet (at the time). There was fish sauce, chicken bouillon, oyster sauce, Chinese cabbage, salmon, gochujang and a bunch of other items that I couldn’t pronounce, let alone cook with.

When I tell you I was off to a rocky start, I mean it. I didn’t touch half the grocery items in my pantry for at least two weeks for fear of messing something up. But as mentioned in my previous blog post, all it took for my confidence and determination to set in was to just try out a recipe. I started with rice and eggs, then moved on to fried rice, pad thai and stir-fries. Once I got comfortable with the items in my cabinet and fridge, I experimented on noodle soups, fried wontons, and a few classic Vietnamese dishes. After making every dish, I would FaceTime my mom to show her how proud I was of myself. Through the screen, I was able to see how proud she was too. For a split moment, it felt like we were eating together at home again.

Here are a few of the dishes that my mom was proud of:

I was desperately craving something to slurp on, so I called my mom to ask how to spice up a broth and we came up with this! This is a simple noodle soup that I made with a basic chicken bone broth seasoned with chicken bouillon, fish sauce, soy sauce, ginger, garlic and a bunch of mix-ins.

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This dish is a classic Vietnamese staple called Bánh Xèo. My mom would make this every once in a while and it always hit just the right spot. Although my version wasn’t nearly as good as my mom’s, it still felt like home.

LINCOLN LE FOR THE HOYA

This dish is called Chả Cá or Vietnamese fried fish cakes. My mom overnighted a huge box of food for me, and this was part of the package. All I had to do was let the paste thaw and fry it in some oil!

LINCOLN LE FOR THE HOYA

This dish is called Bò Lúc Lắc, or “Shaking Beef,” but the more fun name and what I like it call it is “Twerking Beef.” I would order this at the Vietnamese restaurant by my high school all the time and had the sudden urge to recreate it. All I can say is that it was a mighty fine idea.

LINCOLN LE FOR THE HOYA

This next dish is called Chinese Broccoli in Oyster Sauce. My family used to order this every time we would eat out at a Chinese dim sum restaurant for lunch. To satisfy my craving, I decided to give it a try and I was successful!

LINCOLN LE FOR THE HOYA

Now, this last dish hit super close to home. Living in South Florida, my family is full of fishers. During the summer, there was always fresh fish at the house, usually caught the morning of. Luckily, I found a local butcher in Georgetown that sold sashimi-grade tuna and was able to recreate a classic poke bowl!

LINCOLN LE FOR THE HOYA

Living so far away from home and attending a predominately white institution, I was genuinely afraid of losing some of the culture centered at home. However, I quickly came to realize that some of the best forms of culture are created in the kitchen. Cooking is my way of keeping in touch with my roots (and it reminds me to call my parents every day). My mom even tells me I’m starting to cook better than her — but everyone knows nothing beats a home-cooked meal from your parent.

Header Image: MENTAL FLOSS

Frequently Asked Questions: Thanksgiving Edition

Hoyas, Thanksgiving is right around the corner. Turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, apple pie: A literal cornucopia of sweet and savory delights awaits you at your family dining table.

(Unless you’re staying here, in which case, Happy Friendsgiving!)

In spite of that thicc feast being prepared at home, one thing poses a threat to the sanctity of Thanksgiving: your family.

Yes, those people whom you may love the most, who have the ability to ruin your short holiday with the annual awkward interrogations about your life away from home.

And so, 4E has prepared this guide to help you navigate those cringeworthy FAQs around the dinner table.

What do you think of Donald Trump?

Oh, damn. Uncle Bob starting off strong.

Politics is bound to come up during the fall feast, and depending on your views, this question could be a real curveball.

No fear, though, because our professionally designed answer is to laugh awkwardly while walking away and saying, “Man, I don’t know.” Make sure to trail off on “know” to feign some “youthful ignorance” to avoid confrontation. Move quickly before your family starts debating immigration over the mashed potatoes.

Do you still go to church?

This one’s for all my people raised with organized religion (looking at you, Catholics) and is the logically awkward follow-up to a political question.

As your aunt plays with her golden cross necklace, you may feel anxiety in answering her inquiry, because, honestly, you don’t. For all those Christian expats out there, you couldn’t even recite the “Our Father” anymore if she asked. TBH, you always just kinda mumbled through that part.

So, to avoid that disappointing revelation to her, just lie and say “yes“.

And, like before, walk promptly away.

What’s your major?  What are your plans after college?

If these two come in sequence, you better be ready, because this one’s the mother of all one-two punches.

We’re actually going to start with the second question, because it’s the easier of the two. Let’s be honest; there are only two acceptable answers: doctor or lawyer. So, no matter what your major is, if you want to avoid a long line of questioning that ultimately leaves you pissed at your stupid cousin you only ever see once a year, just say doctor or lawyer.

By that logic, admit your major honestly and depending on whether it’s a humanity or a science, choose doctor or lawyer accordingly.

And if you do actually want to be a doctor or lawyer, lucky you.

Do you have a [girlfriend/boyfriend/partner]?

Nope. That’s always the answer, because whenever someone asks, you don’t.

Can you help with the dishes?

Alas, the classic parental guilt trap.

Either your father knows you can’t refuse to do a simple favor, or he’s giving too much credit to your turkey-stuffed corpse.

The dilemma lies in that you could never say no and break his heart, but you sure as hell don’t want to say yes.

Therefore, proceed with the most elementary of “avoiding awkward interactions” maneuvers: Walk away like you didn’t hear anything.

And, finally…

When’s the next time we’ll see you?

You’re at the train station, bus stop, airport or whatever means of transportation is taking you back to Georgetown. You’ve had your fill of food and family. You’re ready to go back and be thrown straight into finals prep.

You’re satisfied and holding it together.

Then, your mother throws this one last rock at you.

You smile and reassure her that Christmas is right around the corner, but despite all the ~uncomfiness~ that sometimes comes with seeing your family, you both want it to be sooner.

So, this is the only question we don’t have an answer for, and all we can do is wish you luck in keeping back tears while you start to miss your mom and her cooking.

Let the feast begin!

Go, Hoyas, run! RUN! Go home (if you can) and celebrate Holy Turkey Day! Papers and midterms and projects and WORK have consumed your life for the past two months.

We’ve all earned an extended break.

So, enjoy some real food with the realest people, whether it be your friends or your family.

And, most of all, get some sleep, because we’re all about to lose plenty of it as soon as we come back! :)

The 5 Stages of Winter Break

1. Relief

You’re Finally Done. Thank God. You made it through an entire semester of Bib Lit without ever actually opening a bible. You recognized more than a generous 50%  of the words on your Spanish exam. Was your final CPS essay good? Not really, but you met the word count, submitted it on time, and most importantly, you’ll never have to talk to your unreliable graduate-student TA ever again! So say goodbye to that Lau cubicle, shove some random clothes and your Juul charger into a duffel bag, and call an Uber to Union Station: it’s officially ~break~.

You, waving goodbye to the poor souls who still have to take a Sociology final

2.  Relaxation

Showering without flip-flops in a bathroom without black mold? Eating a meal that doesn’t involve ramen noodles or flamin’ hot cheetos? Stepping outside and not being greeted by at least a dozen large rats? They should call you King Felipe VI of Spain (G ’95), ‘cause this Hoya is living like royalty. You never knew you would miss suburbia this much. No imminent deadlines, stolen  borrowed quizlets, or panic attacks induced by SaxaNet. You have all the time in the world to lounge around the house, send snapchats of your dog, and debate whether or not it’s still ok to binge watch House of Cards (Editor’s note: It’s not. Stick to Friends. David Schwimmer is our last hope).

Not proofreading that final BlackBoard submission like

3. Remembrance

You meet up with your high school squad at the local Applebee’s and reminisce about Gonzaga   Delbarton your totally unique alma mater. At the wise old age of 20, you fondly look back at the shenanigans of your youth. Remember when you prank called your Calculus teacher? Remember when you stole a beer from your dad’s fridge in the basement? Remember when you said you had “senioritis” but actually continued to try very hard in school because you wanted to go to Georgetown? Haha! Good Times! You weren’t lame at all!

The AP Bio reunion is finna be ~lit~

4. Regret

Ok, it’s been a week and you’ve realized why you were so eager to leave home in the first place. There are no Ubers or places that stay open past 10 pm here. Your parents have an incessant need know where you’re going, who you’re going with, and “is there going to be alcohol there?”. And when you do go out, you have to constantly remind people that you go to Georgetown, not GW and then pretentiously explain why THEY ARE VERY DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. You miss procrastinating on Lau 2 with your friends. You miss saying hi to The Wisey’s Rat. You even find yourself missing New Leo’s (not really, but we’ll pretend for the sake of this article). It’s officially time to go back to the Hilltop.

“You go to GW, right?”

5. Return

You tear up as you see Healy from across the Key Bridge. It’s been too long since last you met. You bask in the glow of a new semester, telling yourself that this is the year you finally get it together. No more going out on Tuesday nights or skipping every class that meets before 2 pm. No more eating Wisey’s cookies for dinner or convincing yourself that walking up Lau steps counts as a workout. Yes, you’ll abandon this attitude completely within the next two weeks, but it’s nice to enjoy the “new and improved 2018 you!” while it lasts. You’re reunited with your squad, you’re wearing the one cool piece of clothing you got for Christmas, and you’re ready for Syllabus Week. Hoya Saxa, it’s good to be home.

You, at Chi Di, two hours after you claimed you were going to start counting your drinks this year, ca 2018, colorized.

Photos/GIFS: Giphy.com, almanac.com

Winter Break Grill Session

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Winter break may be the closest the college body comes to hibernation. We build caves out of our comforters to watch Netflix, forbidding all other humans to enter this sanctuary except for parents returning freshly folded laundry. For three consecutive weeks, we leave the home only to go see Star Wars VII yet again, and live like Wookies with our unshaven legs.

And yet, break is also a time full of awkwardness, where you are debating whether to drink in front of grandparents on Christmas, and those uncomfortable moments when your parents walk in on a naked scene when you’re watching a rerun of Game of Thrones (even though you explain that the brothel scenes usually contain important political plot points).

And then the family and adults in our lives begin to ~grill~ us on the questions that we would rather avoid, making the itch to go back to campus burn even more. We’re all familiar with some version of the annual Winter Break Grill Session, as our relatives compare us to our peers, remind us of the real world outside of college and finally bring up some of the more questionable transactions on our debit cards. Thank goodness we’re finally back at school so we don’t have to answer these awkward questions anymore.

 

Parents: How were your grades this semester?

Well, they developed from B’s to C’s.

 

Parents: Do you have a secret boyfriend/girlfriend you’re not telling us about?

Yesterday I found a chocolate chip in my pocket and ate it. Does that answer your question.

 

Parents: [girl you hate from high school] got into law/med school!

Good for her, and thoughts and prayers to all who have to work with her.

 

Parents: Did you hook up the Saxby’s app to Dad’s credit card?

… But you get $2 off for every $20 you spend.

 

Parents: Have you figured out a plan for after graduation?

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No, but I know what I’m wearing to Senior Ball.

 

Parents: I saw that photo of you at [formal name] on Facebook. How did you wear a bra with that dress?

I didn’t.

 

Parents: Do you honestly think we’ll let you go on spring break [insert place name]?

There are far more dangerous places in the world with less all-inclusive packages than this.

 

Parents: Have you finally gotten lunch with [awkward family friend you don’t want to hang out with]?

Yah … I’ll take a rain check on that one.

 

Parents: Have you ever been GERMsed?

Not that I remember.

 

Parents: What is this “DFMO” I hear you and your friends referencing?

It’s just an MSB major… Da Finance Management Operations.

 

Parents: Wait, you’re still single?

Gee, Gerald and Karen, where do you think I inherited my inability to love?

 

Parent: Do you honestly think we’ll pay for your phone bill after you graduate?

~Yes~

 

Don’t worry, Hoyas. The doldrums of spring semester will soon hit us, and we shall overcome our latest grill session.

 

Image Sources: giphy.com, grovesacademy.org

The Five Stages of Being Home

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As we finish the first week of summer and settle back into our hometown routines, the reality sets in: we are not in Georgetown anymore! The metro, M street stores and Lau breakdowns have now been replaced with highways, malls and TV marathons. As this transition happens, we go through a variety of stages: from total excitement to suburbia induced madness.

1. “The Beginning” Ah, the first week back. The relaxation is setting in and you are being greeted by a bunch of familiar faces: the kitchen (fully stocked!), the local coffee shop and your bed. Nothing can get you down, you are on top of the world. Why did you leave in the first place, home is the bomb.com!

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2. “The Errands” As the days increase, you start to set into your normal routine. You get back into your normal routine: the gym, dry cleaner and gas station workers all welcome you back. Things are easy, the living is good and the stress is minimal. Ah, relaxation.

3. “The Boredom” Somehow you are reminded of your Georgetown life. Whether this is by Facebook or Snapchat, you suddenly realize that you miss your old life so so much. Where is Healy? Why didn’t I get to see Obama? Do Sweetgreen and Goodstuff deliver to Long Island?!

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4. “The Distraction” Naturally, to deal with this sadness, you try to distract yourself. You spend hours upon hours playing with your dog, snapchat all your friends who are still on campus and look through all your Hilltop photos. But, no matter how hard you try, you still cannot forget about Georgetown.

5. “The Acceptance” After a little bit, you accept that you are home, not on the Hilltop, and that it is okay. No, your home is not Georgetown, but it is special no matter what. Anyway, if you are lucky you’ll get to go back to the Hilltop in a few short weeks for some summertime living. For those of you who aren’t heading back, do not worry. 4E will be here to bring you your daily dose of campus while you are away. And, soon enough, you will be back were you belong (AKA with us).

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Hope your transition back to home life is easy!

Photos/Gifs: timeout.com; giphy.com; theodysseyonline.com; chiropractorlakeforest-thejoint.com

Awkward Moments at Home

AwkwardLife back home is sweet. Home-cooked meals, a couch for watching Netflix, pajama days until the end of time. But what happens when you leave the front door and face the outside world? As a college student returning home to the site of some of your most glorious (or embarrassing) days, there is huge potential for awkward moments or encounters. Be on the lookout for some of these common awkward moments:

Running into a teacher at the grocery store 
So, you’re psyched to go grocery shopping with your mom. Who wouldn’t be? It’s been months since you’ve walked through the aisles, smelled the fresh fruit, sampled gourmet cheeses and actually had a fridge big enough to hold it all. As you walk past the milk in your sweats, eyes wide at all the varieties of milk that actually exist, your freshman year math teacher wanders by and catches your eye. She wants to know everything about school, what you’re majoring in, what math classes you’ve taken. You nod and smile and answer the right questions, even though you look like you’ve just been hit by a car and you just want to keep staring at the milk.

Going to a spin classes with your younger sister
Your friends are all still at school but you are dying to hit up SoulCycle to get a little workout in, pre-bathing suit time. You reluctantly take your little sister and all of her annoying middle school friends with you. You pick a bike in the back and try and tune out the incessant chatter of small children, giving the older, more sophisticated members of the gym an apologetic glance as they roll their eyes. But it’s too late. Your mom is thrilled you are doing something with your sister, and she is already bragging to all of her friends and setting up a time for tomorrow. You are stuck for the week.

Finding out that your favorite Thai food place is out of business
You’ve got the perfect evening set up. Head to the absolute best Thai food restaurant for an early dinner, then hit up the movie theater next door to catch up on all those films people are always talking about. You’ve timed it all out, set up the details with friends, and are out the door. But after a third time circling the spot, you are beyond confused. You call them up and find out they’ve gone out of business. So much for dinner plans. Too bad you missed the going away party.

Seeing the high school freshmen that have been friending you
You’ve been ignoring these friend requests for a while now. Overeager freshmen from your high school have been friending you faster than Road Runner tearing down the mountain cliff. You’ve ducked, dipped, dived and dodged them well. That is, until now, when a posse of them come right at you on the street. You recognize them, whether or not you’ll admit it. They recognize you, even though they play it “cool” in front of their “college friends.” You quickly look down, but they know you know them. The damage has been done.

You may not get tangled in all of these snafus before you head back to the Hilltop but there’s a chance you may experience one of them. Our best advice: Don’t leave your house. Or do. You may as well embrace the awkwardness, knowing most of the people you run into aren’t Hoyas and you are. Poor things.

Photo: talesofatwentysomething.wordpress.com

10 Things You Were Glad You Did Before Going Back to School

Winter breakNow that most of us are back on the Hilltop (sorry to those of you who are getting trolled by the weather), let’s reflect on the things that we were really glad we did on the last day before we returned.

1. Stayed in bed until 2 p.m.

Sleeping Beauty knows what’s up.

2. Wore pajamas the entire day.

Just another thing James Franco and I have in common.

3. Didn’t shower.

Like there was anybody to impress anyway.

4. Ate breakfast for dinner, or anything for dinner, or breakfast for anything.

Breakfast Club gets us.

5. Mindlessly watched Netflix for HOURS.

“Am I doing anything on my last day home? NO!”

6. Ate your last home-cooked meal.

Now just savor the taste of that meal to keep you sane through the weeks until Spring Break.

7. Got spoiled by your parents.

Maybe they aren’t Beyoncé, but they still love you and give you things.

8. Finally showered…

The stink got too real.

9. Stayed indoors the entire day and didn’t get judged.

You and all the friends you’ll ever need.

10. Worried about absolutely nothing.

Sounds about right. I hope you had a good last day of vacation. Welcome back to the Hilltop, Hoyas!

GIFS: tumblr, wormsandgermsblog.com

Home Sweet Home: A Personal Reflection

Home Sweet HomeGoing home is a funny thing, and it feels different for everyone. It feels different every time you go home, and the feeling can even change while you are home. So while I sit here, hanging out with my senior citizen of a dog watching Home Alone, I’ll try to capture that feeling as best I can.

I guess it all starts with the celebratory relief of finishing finals. After putting our bodies and minds through two weeks of varying levels of sleep, stress and studying, getting home simply means being able to relax. There is essentially nothing important to think about for two and a half weeks. It’s awesome.

Of course, next is the terrific feeling of actually getting home. For me, that’s taking my first steps on the frozen Rhode Island tundra, taking my first sip of a Dunkin iced coffee (yes, iced) and – most importantly – the warm embrace of my family. I’d be perfectly content sitting around all break, spending my time off just chatting and catching up. If there’s one thing I miss most while away at school, it’s seeing my family every day.

But, of course, after escaping the countless hugs of your family, it’s time to see your friends. No matter how many new friends I make at school, there is still something about spending quality time with the people I grew up with that will never get old. Whether we’re reminiscing about old memories or making new ones, there is rarely a dull moment when we all get back together.

Every break, though, I really miss Georgetown. I miss the sights, sounds and most of all, the people. As great as my family and old friends are, it is always a bit bittersweet to return home.

What stands out to me the most at home are the little things, the things that I just didn’t appreciate as much as I should have before I left for school: the feeling of my bed, the smell of the air and the taste of my mom’s glorious cooking. The sense of everything and everyone coming together to celebrate. The most consistent, defining feeling of being home is appreciation.

Over the coming weeks, take the time to appreciate. While I don’t think there is anything wrong with feeling ready to head back to the Hilltop at the end of break, be sure to enjoy the little things (and the big ones, too) while you are home.

Happy holidays, Hoyas!

How It Felt To Go Home for Winter Break

Home-for-the-Holidays-ColoradoCongratulations, Hoyas, you made it through finals. If you are anything like us at 4E, you’re probably already sitting on your couch and binging on Netflix with a plate of food the size of a dwarf planet. Needless to say, it feels great to be home. But just in case you needed reminding how awesome it really is leave for winter break, we retold your homebound journey for you. It went something like this:

When you finished your last final, you questioned if everything was real life. Could you actually be done?

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In a brain-fried daze, you slowly walked back into your room and opened the door. Then you did this:
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But you suddenly realized your train/plane was leaving in an hour and you hadn’t packed anything.tumblr_lv98xhjZEx1r6aoq4o1_500

So you shoved everything humanly possible into your suitcase and ran out the door.tumblr_m7ujvlcv1X1rcp7w8o1_500

And – thank goodness – you made it to the airport/train station. [Insert sigh of relief.]

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Your travelling came and went. Before you knew it, you saw your house. And then it hit you: YOU WERE HOME!

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And then you walked inside your house and everything just felt so good.

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And then you saw your fridge filled with food!

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After that, you realized you had an infinite amount of free time with no homework to do …

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… except listen to Beyoncé’s new album. Over. And. Over. Again.beyonce-1

But wait! You just realized Christmas is coming!excited-1

And, finally, the most amazingly breathtaking thing of all happened: YOU SAW YOUR BED.

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So for the next 14 hours, you looked like this.

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Yeah, that’s basically how it all went down. Enjoy your time off and happy holidays from 4E!

GIFS: tumblr; Photo: backround-pictures.feedio.net

What We’ve Enjoyed While at Home

HomeFor a Georgetown student, breaks from school can sometimes feel few and far between. So, as the first holiday break of the school year, Thanksgiving provided the perfect chance to travel home and recharge for a few days. Before returning to the Hilltop, let’s look back and savor the moments we enjoyed this weekend:

Sleeping in Your Own Bed

Unless you are the Muggle twin of Harry Potter and you sleep under the staircase, seeing your bed for the first time in three months is an unforgettable experience of love. Think about that mattress that comforted you throughout all those years. Or those sheets (really, though, those sheets!), which covered you in a clean sandwich of cozy cloth. But what about that pillow (that PILLOW!) that didn’t care when you fluffed it for max fluff or flipped it to the cool side because all it wanted was to provide your head stability and care? And please don’t tell me that you forgot about that comforter (THAT COMFORTER) that your parents got you so long ago that you can’t remember spending a day or night without it. It’s played such a significant role in your life that you should consider sitting next to it in this year’s holiday card! Your bed loves you and don’t you ever forget it!

Thanksgiving Dinner at Home

There are so many different ways to celebrate Thanksgiving, but they all include huge amounts of food. Ranging from classics like turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes and pumpkin pie to more personalized additions like my cousin’s beautiful lasagna or my same cousin’s grandma’s coveted stuffed peppers, these foods pile up to be quite the feast for the hungry college kid. Regardless of which foods are or are not available to your Thanksgiving smorgasbord, the Hoyas who went home for Thanksgiving dinner can all agree that we needed this meal. The copious amounts of home-cooked or semi-fresh store-bought meals and even the sheer availability of utensils and cups that don’t stick together ensured that we had a better meal than we would have had at Leo’s.

Black Friday Shopping/Sleeping

Even before the turkey gets put in the oven, people are buzzing over Black Friday sales. Conveniently for anybody searching for information regarding Black Friday, Rebecca Black’s hit song “Friday” really hits the capitalist nail on the head here. “Seein’ everything, time is goin’/ Tickin’ on and on, everybody’s rushin’!” sings Black, almost as if she were in a Walmart this hectic Friday, trying to clear her Christmas list early. Surprisingly, this “gotta have my bowl, gotta have cereal” attitude emboldens shoppers to go so far as to line up to shop at midnight.

While everybody is entitled to subject themselves to the mania of Black Friday, if any of you Hoyas are like me, you chose sleep over sales. You may have to buy that new pair of shoes at full price, but at least you will have your dignity.

(Writer’s Note: Sorry for the Rebecca Black plug, but props to the girl for being the only thing found in my google search for ‘black’ ‘friday’ ‘gifs’.)

Seeing Friends for the First Time in Forever

Finally, after three whole months, you can finally see your old friends that you left behind. For some of you, you have been waiting for this moment since you left your hometown for Georgetown. Thanksgiving is all about taking a step back from the hustle and bustle of life and remembering (even thanking!) those people who give our lives meaning. For others though, you may be dreading a return to the days of braces, acne and overall high school awkwardness. But, come on! You’ve gotta rack up some stories for the five-year reunion. And if you lose your high school friend base, who will you have to brag to about the fact that you are a Hoya?

Spending Time with the Family

Now for the gushy part. Although the Hilltop provides us with so many people to be thankful for, not everybody who made us who we are today lives there. Your family, to whatever degree, has shaped the person you are and for that you had better be thankful! Don’t lie: They might be weird, annoying and/or embarrassing, but they’re still family. You don’t get to see them all the time, so be thankful for every chance you get!

From all of us at 4E, we hope you had a great break at home!

Photos/Gifs: Tumblr, Westallrealestate