Ways to Cope With Club Rejection

Hey, Hoyas! It’s that time of the year again: Rejection Week. Those seven days where you suddenly discover that you’re unwanted by the all the things you ~thought~ you were passionate about. Anyway, here are some ways to cope  while getting over the club rejection blues.

0. Give up*

Yeah, that’s right. You gave it your best, and it fell through. What’s the point? The world has just told you that you’re just not good enough, so give up.

Like Willy Wonka says, “You get… NOTHING!!! You lose! GOOD DAY, SIR!’

*The Writer would like to inform the reader at this point that this advice is not legitimate and must not be taken entirely seriously. Do, however, feel free to rewatch the original version of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (and not the creepy 2005 remake starring Johnny Depp.)

1. Try something new

While calling it quits shouldn’t really be a reaction to rejection, experimentation is entirely legitimate. You may not have gotten exactly what you wanted, but that one missed opportunity leaves a realm of possibilities to discover. All that time you would’ve spent playing volleyball, practicing improv, or making coffee can be used to discover all the things campus has to offer.

Barack Obama White House Correspondents Dinner 2013 GIF by Obama - Find & Share on GIPHY

Try another sport. Join a different comedy group. Work at Starbucks.

Think outside the box and join Anime Club.

You could very easily discover something else you love just as much.

2. Gather the other rejects and make your own club

Just because you were “rejected” doesn’t mean you’re alone…or even talentless. We all know that club culture is notoriously cutthroat, and sometimes, organizations simply can’t let everyone in. It’s not personal, it’s just business.

In that case, find the people who share your interests–and your hardship–and work together. If you really love the thing that rejected you, chances are you have a clear vision of what you want from it and how to make it better. Stronger. Perfect.

Find allies. Build your strength. One day you may even surpass those who abandoned you. And won’t that be a delightful?

3. Practice, practice, practice

And if you just don’t like talking to people, go solo. 

If you’re a rejected writer, keep writing. If you’re a rejected comedian, keep making people laugh. Rejected actors, make a one-man show. Rejected GUASFCU people, give out sketchy loans and charge exorbitant interest.

Whatever it is you’re passionate about, don’t give it up. Keep playing to your strengths and feelings. Refine your craft so that next year, they don’t have a choice but to take you.

And, if not, you’ll really know what you love and no one can tell you otherwise.

4. Spend time with your friends

While you shouldn’t give up, sometimes you just need a break. If you don’t want to go too hard on refining your craft or making a new club, then just spend time with your friends. We promise we won’t judge your Netflix marathons. 

Those people will keep supporting you, and they will always see the value in what you create or the abilities you are most proud of.

And remember, sometimes your friends know friends who also have friends. Expand your horizons and make new connections. This is what we call ~networking~.  Stay positive and don’t be salty about the past- good things usually come when you least expect it. 

5. Focus on school

Maybe some free time is exactly what you needed. Midterms are on the horizon. Papers, essays, quizzes, readings will start to get a ~little~ heavier soon. Use the time you have to make the rest of the semester as smooth as possible.

If you really put in the time, who knows? You might even end up taking an interest in one of your classes. Stranger things have happened.

It’s also what you’re paying for at the end of the day, and you don’t want to screw that up. S/o to all the parents who clicked on this. 

When all is said and done…

Rejection is always difficult. Especially in a time (and in a city) where getting what you want is a sign of success. Compromise and acceptance are forgotten arts. 

So, we leave you with this:

“The beauty is that through disappointment you can gain clarity, and with clarity comes conviction and true originality.”

–Conan O’Brien

Keep your heads up, kids. Keep on keepin’ on.

 

Sources: giphy.com,

7 Types of Rejection at Georgetown

Rejection at Georgetown

If you’re a student at Georgetown, rejection is no stranger. Of course, there’s the most obvious definition of rejection of being turned down by someone who is probably wayyyy out of your league. But there’s another kind that floods your email the start of every semester. That just comes with being a Hoya. Shall we begin?

1. We must first cover the most basic form of rejection. No, that guy/girl did not want to bring you back to his/her dorm from Vil A.

2. When it’s actually harder to get into Georgetown Clubs than it is to get into Georgetown…or Harvard.

3. When you apply to breathe the same air as Michael Phelps, but they didn’t want your ugliness to ruin the shots. Welp, hah! He wasn’t even there.

4. When you’re at Leo’s during its off hours and there’s not even shredded lettuce left. Apparently, even Leo’s doesn’t want to comfort you.

5. When you ask to see your Professor during office hours and he introduces you to his 20-year-old TA.

6. When you go to Brown House and even your 10:0 girl ratio just isn’t good enough.

7. When you finally run into Jack the Bulldog, and his walker says, “No, pictures with Jack. Or touching.”

And there you have it, folks. Don’t forget to stay awesome.

Images: giphy.com, https://bit.ly/2eblaa0

Loud and Proud in the Capital

Gayest City In AmericaStep aside New York and San Fran, there is a new LGBT-friendly city on top!

According to DCist, The Advocate has determined that Washington, D.C., is the most gay-tolerant city in the United States. Surprisingly, previously believed “gay cities” like NYC and LA weren’t even in the top 10!

The Advocate’s list was determined by using unusual methods and data, which Advocate editor-in-chief Matthew Breen has described as “designed to uncover the hidden factors that give a city its queer cred.” These new factors have changed the outcomes and preconceived ideas about what makes certain cities the most LGBT-friendly, shedding light on new and less discrete characteristics.

In its survey of different U.S. cities, The Advocate specifically noted and admired the District’s nightlife and gay-friendly neighborhoods. Places like Dupont and Logan Circle have garnered national attention for their tolerant attitudes, and they serve as examples of the acceptance and LBGT-friendly atmosphere in D.C. In addition, the District boasts a long LBGT-friendly history and currently has 17 elected gay officials.

With all of the current uproar and commotion surrounding gay marriage, D.C.’s new title as the gayest city in the U.S. demonstrates its importance during a time of changing American attitudes in the fight for equality. And – more importantly – it shows yet another reason why we’re proud to be Hoyas in the nation’s capital.

 

Five Steps for Coping with the Government Shutdown, As Told By Social Media

Government Shutdown

As everyone knows (and if you don’t know, you’ve apparently been under a rock for the last week), the federal government has been shut down due to a failure to agree on a new debt budget.  Social media, especially Twitter, has been EN FUEGO (on fire, for our non-Spanish speaking readers) with commentary on the shutdown. These tweets have been witty, sad, controversial and everything in between.  Here are the 5 Steps for Coping with the Government Shutdown, As Told By Social Media*:

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*Disclaimer: these posts are not representative of my views or those of The Hoya. They simply made me chuckle:

1. Anarchy

If your first reaction was one similar to theirs, you should probably check out this article from early last week.

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2. Acceptance

Now that people began to understand what the shutdown meant, the posts became a little calmer, albeit a bit melodramatic.

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3. Prioritize

How does the shutdown affect you? What should you look out for?

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4. Try to Find a Solution

Some Hoyas on Facebook had some advice for getting through the shutdown:

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5. Look at the Silver Lining

You aren’t in Congress, so unfortunately, there isn’t a whole lot we can do at the moment. Just try and look at the bright side!Screen Shot 2013-10-07 at 8.19.01 PM

While the government shutdown is certainly no laughing matter, at least these students and celebrities helped me get a laugh out of the ordeal.  If you are looking for more bizarre humor, just search “government shutdown pickup lines” on Twitter. Yup, it’s trending.  Hopefully this will be the last shutdown post out of us, and a big thank you to those of you that made it possible.  Keep up the good work!

Photo: Amari O’Bannon, Huffington Post, ParkTheaterVideo